Teachers' Notes for The Cross of St George, the Union Jack and Cultural Diversity

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INTRODUCTION

This unit looks at both traditional and contemporary notions of 'Englishness' and 'Britishness'.

Most of us have little notion of what it means to be English or British these days - this unit is designed to help stimulate thought and discussion on this recently neglected notion.

This unit is designed for KS4 / Y10 Citzenship. There at least three or four lessons here, more if you choose, plus homework, project and plenary options.

SUGGESTED USE

As usual we are suggesting one format for the use of this material - please feel free to adapt to suit your teaching needs. Don't forget to send us feedback on your experiences using this material.

Lesson 1

The teacher introduces the subject using section (A) followed by some group work via (B). Then individual or paired work (C) and plenary/homework (D).

Teachers may wish to differentiate the text on St George with simplified versions - if so, please send it in to us at feedback@iRespect.net

Lesson 2

Uses section (E) and runs through points 4, 5, 6 and 7.

Lesson(s) 3/4

You may choose to make this one or two lessons based on section (F). They are categorisation and thinking skills lesson(s). Example literary extracts illustrating aspects of Englishness are listed here, running from A-Z. These are group work lessons.

Using The Remaining Sections

FURTHER READING

A lot of research, experience, reading and reflection has gone into this unit - but if there is one book that I would recommend here for further reading for teachers it would be “The Making of English National Identity” by Krishnan Kumar. C.U.P. 2003 1SBN 0-521-77736- 4

“Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves,
Britons never never never shall be slaves”,
But that’s because Great Britain owned the slaves
And millions from Africa found their graves
In land and water far from their homes’ dreams
And some died in England so fair and so green,
And England’s the subject that directs my pen,
For is England now what it was then?


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